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Home > New Gear > Google Cache and Archive.org: How to restore a web page
Google Cache and Archive.org: How to restore a web page

Google Cache and Archive.org: How to restore a web page

By  Lydia Scott 2019-06-17 347 0

The Google Cache and Archive.org provide ways to get lost or thought lost content from the web. In the following article, you'll read how it works.

Suppose you've put a website in your bookmark collection and when you reload it, you find that it no longer exists. However, you would still like to read the special map of Auenland or the description of Winterfell again.

Or you have set up a fan website yourself, invested a lot of your heart and soul, but stopped and deleted the project for lack of time ... without creating backups. After a few years the fever gets you again, you want to revive the project, but how do you get the old content?

Maybe you just want to know what a certain website looked like twelve years ago and what content it had. How can you do that?

In such and similar scenarios, the Google cache or the Internet archive can help. The emphasis is on being able.

The Google cache and Archive.org offer possibilities to access lost or supposedly lost content from the web. In the following article you will read how it works.

Let's say you've put a website in your bookmark collection and when you reload it, you find that it no longer exists. However, you would still like to read the special map of Auenland or the description of Winterfell again.

Or you have set up a fan website yourself, invested a lot of your heart and soul, but stopped and deleted the project for lack of time ... without creating backups. After a few years the fever gets you again, you want to revive the project, but how do you get the old content?

Maybe you just want to know what a certain website looked like twelve years ago and what content it had. How can you do that?

In such and similar scenarios, the Google cache or the Internet archive can help. The emphasis is on being able.

The Google cache and Archive.org offer possibilities to access lost or supposedly lost content from the web. In the following article you will read how it works.

Let's say you've put a website in your bookmark collection and when you reload it, you find that it no longer exists. However, you would still like to read the special map of Auenland or the description of Winterfell again.

Or you have set up a fan website yourself, invested a lot of your heart and soul, but stopped and deleted the project for lack of time ... without creating backups. After a few years the fever gets you again, you want to revive the project, but how do you get the old content?

Maybe you just want to know what a certain website looked like twelve years ago and what content it had. How can you do that?

In such and similar scenarios, the Google cache or the Internet archive can help. The emphasis is on being able.

With this result one can often already work and take pictures, texts and further contents. However, one should not approach the whole thing too optimistically. Sometimes the CSS doesn't quite come along, not every blog article has a cache, and depending on the website, Google may renew the cache after a few days or after one or two weeks. So you have to hurry if you want to save the content.

The Google Cache and Archive.org provide ways to get lost or thought lost content from the web. In the following article, you'll read how it works.

Suppose you've put a website in your bookmark collection and when you reload it, you find that it no longer exists. However, you would still like to read the special map of Auenland or the description of Winterfell again.

Or you have set up a fan website yourself, invested a lot of your heart and soul, but stopped and deleted the project for lack of time ... without creating backups. After a few years the fever gets you again, you want to revive the project, but how do you get the old content?

Maybe you just want to know what a certain website looked like twelve years ago and what content it had. How can you do that?

In such and similar scenarios, the Google cache or the Internet archive can help. The emphasis is on being able.

The Google cache and Archive.org offer possibilities to access lost or supposedly lost content from the web. In the following article you will read how it works.

Let's say you've put a website in your bookmark collection and when you reload it, you find that it no longer exists. However, you would still like to read the special map of Auenland or the description of Winterfell again.

Or you have set up a fan website yourself, invested a lot of your heart and soul, but stopped and deleted the project for lack of time ... without creating backups. After a few years the fever gets you again, you want to revive the project, but how do you get the old content?

Maybe you just want to know what a certain website looked like twelve years ago and what content it had. How can you do that?

In such and similar scenarios, the Google cache or the Internet archive can help. The emphasis is on being able.

The Google cache and Archive.org offer possibilities to access lost or supposedly lost content from the web. In the following article you will read how it works.

Let's say you've put a website in your bookmark collection and when you reload it, you find that it no longer exists. However, you would still like to read the special map of Auenland or the description of Winterfell again.

Or you have set up a fan website yourself, invested a lot of your heart and soul, but stopped and deleted the project for lack of time ... without creating backups. After a few years the fever gets you again, you want to revive the project, but how do you get the old content?

Maybe you just want to know what a certain website looked like twelve years ago and what content it had. How can you do that?

In such and similar scenarios, the Google cache or the Internet archive can help. The emphasis is on being able.

With this result one can often already work and take pictures, texts and further contents. However, one should not approach the whole thing too optimistically. Sometimes the CSS doesn't quite come along, not every blog article has a cache, and depending on the website, Google may renew the cache after a few days or after one or two weeks. So you have to hurry if you want to save the content.

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